200.000ster Besucher in der Ausstellung „Gesichter der Renaissance“ – Bode-Museum Berlin

•November 6, 2011 • Leave a Comment





Bode-Museum Berlin



Gesichter der Renaissance.
Meisterwerke italienischer Portrait-Kunst
25. August – 20. November 2011





Am Freitag 4. November konnte in der stark nachgefragten Ausstellung „Gesichter der Renaissance“ im Bode-Museum auf der Museumsinsel Berlin der 200.000ste Besucher begrüßt werden:


200.000ste Besucher der Ausstellung


v.l.n.r.: Michael Eissenhauer, Sarah Bühler, Kim David Bühler mit Hedi, Stefan Weppelmann
Foto: David von Becker





Kim David Bühler (26, Bühnentechniker am Theater) kam gemeinsam mit seiner Frau Sarah Bühler (32, Schauspielerin) und ihrer Tochter Hedi Bühler (6 Monate). Alle leben in Berlin Kreuzberg und wollten sich anlässlich des Geburtstages von Sarah Bühler die Ausstellung ansehen.

Um 10:30 Uhr wurde die Familie Bühler vom Generaldirektor der Staatlichen Museen zu Berlin, Michael Eissenhauer, sowie weiteren Vertretern des Museums empfangen.
„Der große Besucherandrang im Bode-Museum ist eine wunderbare Bestätigung unserer Arbeit! Denn hinter den „Gesichtern“ stehen unsere wertvollen Sammlungsbestände und fundierte wissenschaftliche Forschung. Beide Komponenten sind Grundlage unserer Museumsarbeit und haben diese Ausstellung zu einem überragenden Erfolg geführt,“ freute sich Michael Eissenhauer und überreichte den überraschten Besuchern einen Gutschein über zwei von airberlin gesponserte Flüge nach New York, sowie ein Jahresabonnement von art – Das Kunstmagazin.

Anschließend führte der Kurator der Ausstellung, Stefan Weppelmann, die Familie persönlich durch die rund 150 Meisterwerke der italienischen Frührenaissance.


Von Beginn an war die Ausstellung im Berliner Bode-Museum ein Publikumsmagnet. Erst vor vier Wochen konnte die 100.000ste Besucherin in der Ausstellung begrüßt werden.


Auch nach der Abreise des Gemäldes „Dame mit dem Hermelin“ von Leonardo da Vinci reißt der Besucherandrang nicht ab. Bis zum 20. November 2011 ist die Ausstellung noch im Bode-Museum zu sehen. Die Veranstalter empfehlen die langen Öffnungszeiten von Donnerstag bis Sonntag zu nutzen.




Courtesy Bode-Museum Berlin






Links





Stampfli & Turci – Art Dealers


Disclaimer & Copyright





Extremes Brasilian Photography 1840/2011 – Center of Fine Arts, Brussels

•November 6, 2011 • Leave a Comment




Palais des Beaux-Arts, Bruxelles



Extremes
Brasilian Photography 1840/2011
06.10.2011 > 15.01.2012





The “Extremes” exhibition presents two poles of the history of photography in Brazil. The first section, curated by Pedro Vasquez, contains daguerreotypes, ferrotypes, and ambrotypes, old technology from before the introduction of the negative, illustrating the first hundred years of that rich history. The contrasting second section looks at the photography of recent decades, in which a whole range of modern techniques have been used to create exuberant images. Images of a vast land, from the Amazon forest and the desolate hinterland: a photography of abundance and poverty, ugliness and beauty, ecstasy and delicacy, contrasts both historical and contemporary – a photography of extremes. The contemporary section is curated by Guy Veloso and Rosely Nakagawa.


Walter Firmo


© Walter Firmo, Untitled, Caravelas-Bahia (Brazil), 1970

André Cypriano


Favela da Rocinha – membros da ONG SURFAVELA, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil
© André Cypriano

Walter Firmo


© Walter Firmo





Curators : Pedro Afonso Vasquez, Guy Veloso, Rosely Nakagawa, Frank Van Haecke


Courtesy Palais des Beaux-Arts
Images © All rights reserved





Links





Stampfli & Turci – Art Dealers


Disclaimer & Copyright





Cast from ivory book cover in the Bodleian Library, Oxford – Photo of the day

•November 6, 2011 • Leave a Comment


Published by Geoff Barker on October 23, 2011 in Photo of the day.





Powerhouse Museum – Sydney





    Cast from ivory book cover in the Bodleian Library, Oxford






    This photo-mechanical print is one of the 24 Woodburytypes pasted into J. O. Westwood’s 1876 publication, ‘Fictile [casts of] Ivories in the South Kensington Museum’.

    This print shows the front of a book cover carved from Ivory in Italy between 800 and 1000. The cover is in the Bodleian Library in Oxford and is an important example of early Christian art. In the centre is a youthful Christ, with long flowing hair and a cruciferous nimbus, treading down the lion, serpent, dragon and a young lion (Psalm xci, v. 13).

    In his right hand he is holding a cross over his shoulders, and in his left an open book, inscribed IHS. XPS SUP(er) ASP(idem). Around him are twelve small compartments surrounded by borders ornamented with classical mouldings and pilasters, that contain representations of earlier scenes of the Gospel history and it is possible that the other part of the cover, which is now lost, showed later events with the Crucifixion in the centre.

    Moving clockwise from the top left corner, the first compartment shows the prophet Isaiah standing by a tree holding a scroll inscribed ECCE VIRG(o) CONCI(piet) (Is. vii. 14) in Roman capitals, the C and G in the angulated form. The second compartment shows the Salutation of the archangel Gabriel. The Virgin Mary is sitting with her hands raised and open in front of her and her attendant is standing by a group of buildings. Gabriel, with a long rod, has just reached the ground and his wings are still partly extended. The third compartment shows the birth of Christ.

    Joseph is sitting at the bottom to the right, Mary is sitting on the bed to the left and the infant Jesus is lying in swaddling clothes on the manger, with the heads of the ox and ass seen to the right. The fourth compartment shows the three Magi offering their gifts to Jesus who is sitting on Mary’s knees. The fifth compartment shows Herod commanding the slaughter of the children, one of whom lied dead at his feet, whilst another, who is larger than its mother who stands nearby with uplifted hands, is held by an attendant who is about to dash it to the ground.

    The sixth compartment shows the Baptism of Christ, represented as a naked youth. The river Jorddan, in which his is to be baptised, flows out of a rock to the right. The Baptist, depicted as an aged man, stands to the left with his right hand on the head of Christ, over whom hovers the holy dove with rays springing from its beak. The seventh panel shows the first miracle at the marriage feast in Cana, with Christ commanding the servant to fill the six water-pots with water. The eighth compartment shows Christ asleep in the ship being woken by his three disciples.

    The ninth compartment shows Christ restoring life to the ruler’s daughter (Matthwe ix. v. 25), who is lying on the bed, at the side of which stand her father and Christ, who has his right hand raised in benediction. The tenth compartment shows Christ driving the devils out of the demoniac and into the herd of swine, who are rushing downwards towards the sea.

    The eleventh compartment shows Christ healing the paralytic, who is carrying his bed on his shoulders in the same way as is seen on early Christian sarcophagi. The twelfth compartment shows the woman with the bloody flux touching the hem of Christ’s clothes.



No known copyright restrictions.


    © Copyright Powerhouse Museum


Links





Stampfli & Turci – Art Dealers


Disclaimer & Copyright





Photographie Brésilienne 1840/2011 – Palais des Beaux-Arts, Bruxelles

•November 6, 2011 • 1 Comment




Palais des Beaux-Arts, Bruxelles



Extremes
Photographie Brésilienne 1840/2011
06.10.2011 > 15.01.2012





L’exposition Extremes montre la diversité de la photographie brésilienne. Elle met en lumière ses aspects historiques comme sa production contemporaine. Des images d’un pays immense, de la forêt amazonienne et de l’hinterland abandonné, une photographie de l’abondance et de la pauvreté, de la laideur et de la beauté, de l’extase et de la délicatesse, autant de contrastes surgis de l’histoire et de l’actualité, et immortalisés par une photographie des extrêmes.


Walter Firmo


© Walter Firmo, Untitled, Caravelas-Bahia (Brazil), 1970

André Cypriano


Favela da Rocinha – membros da ONG SURFAVELA, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil
© André Cypriano

Walter Firmo


© Walter Firmo





Photographes contemporains:
Adenor Gondim – Anderson Schneider – André Cypriano – Andre Vieira – Carlos Moreira – Cássio Vasconcellos – Claudia Andujar – Cristiano Mascaro – Gustavo Lacerda – José Bassit – Julio Santos – Luiz Braga – Maureen Bisilliat – Paula Sampaio – Pedro Lobo – Thomaz Farkas – Tiago Santana – Walter Firmo


Commissaires : Pedro Afonso Vasquez, Guy Veloso, Rosely Nakagawa


Courtesy Palais des Beaux-Arts
Visuels © Tous droits réservés





Links





Stampfli & Turci – Art Dealers


Disclaimer & Copyright





Dancing in Shanghai, 1926 – Photo of the day

•November 6, 2011 • Leave a Comment


Published by Kathy Hackett on November 5, 2011 in Photo of the day.





Powerhouse Museum – Sydney





    Dancing in Shanghai, 1926






    This photograph from an unknown studio shows Florence, ‘Bobby’ Broadhurst and an unidentified dance partner in Shanghai in 1926. The photograph was probably used to promote The Broadhurst Academy.

    The Broadhurst Academy Incorporated School of the Arts, a finishing school created to attract clients from the wealthy British and American expatriate communities, was the first business venture attempted by the adventurous young Australian, Florence Broadhurst. The Academy offered classes in a range of disciplines including dancing, elocution, deportment and short-story writing.

    Florence Broadhurst’s time in Shanghai was brief, a little over twelve months, but she made her mark, endeavouring to have her academy publicised whenever possible. Today, Broadhurst is best-remembered for her striking wallpaper designs. Some of these designs, along with other photographs from the album that includes this image, can be viewed in the Powerhouse Museum online collection database. Another photograph of Florence dancing has been published previously on Photo of the Day.



Post by Kathy Hackett, Photo Librarian
Photographer unknown.
No known copyright restrictions.


    © Copyright Powerhouse Museum


Links





Stampfli & Turci – Art Dealers


Disclaimer & Copyright





French ivory book cover of Christ – Photo of the day

•November 6, 2011 • Leave a Comment


Published by Geoff Barker on November 6, 2011 in Photo of the day.





Powerhouse Museum – Sydney





    French ivory book cover of Christ






    This photograph is of a section of a book cover carved from ivory in France between 900 and 1100. It shows a large figure of Christ, with a large, pearled, cruciferous nimbus, seated within a double aureola, the large upper one pointed at the top and the lower one round and surrounding the legs and forming a seat on which he is sitting. He is depicted as quite young, with long flowing hair, beardless. He is holding a book in his left hand, while his right is raised in benediction. In the four corners are the four winged symbols of the Evangelists (Matthew = an angel, Mark = a winged lion, Luke = a winged ox, John = an eagle). On both sides of Christ are six winged cherubim and below them are circular discs with the bull of Sol, with the head uncovered, resting on a plain round nimbus, and Luna, with a crescent. Below each of them is a rosette surrounded by a foliated border.

    This photo-mechanical print is one of the 24 Woodburytypes pasted into J. O. Westwood’s 1876 publication, ‘Fictile [casts of] Ivories in the South Kensington Museum’.



No known copyright restrictions.


    © Copyright Powerhouse Museum


Links





Stampfli & Turci – Art Dealers


Disclaimer & Copyright





Neapel und der Süden – Fotografien 1846-1900 / Neue Pinakothek München

•November 6, 2011 • Leave a Comment





Neue Pinakothek München



Neapel und der Süden
Fotografien 1846-1900
Sammlung Siegert
11.11.2011-26.02.2012


Die Ausstellung der Neuen Pinakothek bietet die Gelegenheit, Neapel und die Landschaften im Süden Italiens in Aufnahmen bedeutender Fotografen des 19. Jahrhunderts kennenzulernen.


NEAPEL UND DER SÜDEN


Calvert Richard Jones, Mole mit Blick auf Castel S. Elmo in Neapel, 1846
© Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen / Sammlung Siegert





Hört man von Neapel, steigen sofort Bilder vor dem geistigen Auge auf, gleichgültig, ob man die Stadt aus eigener Anschauung kennt oder nicht. Das Klischee vom sonnigen Süden, von einer üppigen Natur in begünstigtem Klima, von traumhaft schönen Landschaften, dem »dolce far niente«: wenn es einen Ort gibt, mit dem sich all diese Vorstellungen verbinden lassen, dann ist es Neapel.

Die Aufnahmen inszenieren die landschaftlichen Attraktionen von Sorrent und Capri, zeigen berühmte antike Stätten wie Pompeji oder Agrigent, bieten aber auch Impressionen des Alltagslebens in der Metropole Neapel, in der wie an keinem anderen Ort Italiens die Gegensätze von arm und reich, von oben und unten aufeinanderprallten. Lazzaroni, Lebenskünstler, badende Kinder, die noble Gesellschaft an der Riviera di Chiaia: Neapel war ein Ort der Kontraste und Gegensätze wie keine andere Stadt Italiens. Mag manche Aufnahme auch Klischees befördert haben und im Atelier des Fotografen inszeniert worden sein, so bietet sie doch einen faszinierenden Blick auf mittlerweile untergegangene Lebenswelten und Wirklichkeiten.

In der Ausstellung werden 120 Fotografien von zwanzig verschiedenen Fotografen gezeigt. Die Aufnahmen sind im Zeitraum zwischen 1846 und der Wende zum 20. Jahrhundert entstanden sind. Es ist die Epoche, in der sich das neue Medium auch im Süden der Halbinsel ausbreitete, reisende Fotografen aus England, Frankreich und Deutschland, bald aber auch einheimische Fotokünstler ihre Aufnahmen am Golf von Neapel, in Kampanien und auf Sizilien machten. Sie belegen den Wandel des Blicks von der romantisch gefärbten Vedute hin zur sachlich dokumentierenden Fotografie, die sich mit der beginnenden wissenschaftlichen Erforschung der archäologischen Denkmäler ausbreitete und diese wesentlich förderte. Zu sehen sind Aufnahmen von Pionieren der Fotografie wie Calvert Richard Jones, Firmin-Eugène Le Dieu und Gustave Le Gray, darunter seltene Kostbarkeiten wie die Aufnahme des Doms von Syrakus von George Wilson Bridges aus dem Jahr 1846. Im Mittelpunkt aber steht das Werk des deutschen Fotografen Giorgio Sommer, der seit 1856 in Italien lebte und 1857/58 ein Atelier in Neapel gründete, das bald das erfolgreichste in der Stadt war.


NEAPEL UND DER SÜDEN



Giorgio Sommer, Fassaden in S. Lucia, Neapel, um 1878
© Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen / Sammlung Siegert

NEAPEL UND DER SÜDEN



Si traduce il frances, um 1868
© Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen / Sammlung Siegert





Die vulkanische Natur bescherte Kampanien besondere landschaftliche Attraktionen, war aber auch stets latente Gefährdung. Die Ausgrabungen der Vesuvstädte, die nach der Staatsgründung neuen Aufschwung nahmen, förderten sensationelle Funde zutage, die von den Fotografen dokumentiert wurden. Der Vesuv stellte aber auch eine aktuelle Bedrohung dar. Den Ausbruch am 26. April 1872 dokumentierte Giorgio Sommer in einer Serie von Aufnahmen im Abstand von jeweils einer halben Stunde. Ebenso bedrohlich war die Gefahr von Erdbeben. 1883 wurde der Badeort Casamicciola auf Ischia durch ein Erdbeben völlig zerstört, ein Ereignis, das durch bedrückende Fotografien dokumentiert wurde.


NEAPEL UND DER SÜDEN



Giorgio Sommer, Der Ausbruch des Vesuvs am 26. April 1872, halb 4 Uhr nachmittags
© Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen / Sammlung Siegert

NEAPEL UND DER SÜDEN



Giorgio Sommer, Ausgrabungen in Pompeji: Abguss eines toten menschlichen Körpers, um 1870
© Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen / Sammlung Siegert





Fotografien bezeugen aber auch politische Umwälzungen, die sich in Italien in jenen Jahrzehnten ereigneten, das Risorgimento mit dem Höhepunkt der Staatsgründung im Sommer 1861, vor nunmehr 150 Jahren. Mit seinem »Zug der Tausend« hat Garibaldi im Frühjahr 1860 das Bourbonenreich in Sizilien angegriffen und am 27. Mai Palermo eingenommen. Die Barrikaden und Zerstörungen in der umkämpften Altstadt von Palermo wurden in Fotografien von Luigi Sacchi dokumentiert, frühe Zeugnisse der Reportagefotografie und seltene Bilddokumente der Einigungskämpfe Italiens.


NEAPEL UND DER SÜDEN



Luigi Sacchi, Via di Toledo und das Dominikanerkloster S. Caterina nach der Einnahme Palermos durch die Truppen Garibaldis am 29. Mai 1860
© Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen / Sammlung Siegert





Die Ausstellung »Neapel und der Süden. Fotografien 1846–1900« entstand in Zusammenarbeit mit dem renommierten Münchner Fotosammler Dietmar Siegert, aus dessen Beständen die ausgewählten Aufnahmen stammen. Sie bildet den Abschluss einer Reihe von Ausstellungen zu den Anfängen der Fotografie in Italien, die 1996 mit Venedig begonnen, 1997 mit Florenz und 2005 mit Rom fortgesetzt wurde.

Zur Ausstellung erscheint ein Begleitband im Verlag Hatje Cantz, mit einer Einführung der Fotohistorikerin Dorothea Ritter und Katalogtexten von Dorothea Ritter und Annette Hojer (192 Seiten mit 135 Abbildungen, 39.80 Euro)

Kurator: Dr. Herbert W. Rott







Courtesy Neue Pinakothek München
Bildmaterial © Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen / Sammlung Siegert






Links





Stampfli & Turci – Art Dealers


Disclaimer & Copyright





 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 30 other followers

%d bloggers like this: