Edward Hopper and His Time – Exhibition at the Kunsthal Rotterdam






Kunsthal Rotterdam



Modern Life
Edward Hopper and His Time
26 September 2009 to 17 January 2010



In the spacious daylight hall of the Kunsthal, the exhibition Modern Life. Edward Hopper and His Time presents eight top works by Hopper together with over ninety master pieces from the collection of the Whitney Museum of Modern Art in New York.

For the very first time ever works by Edward Hopper are shown within the context of their time, together with works by famous artists like Georgia O’Keeffe, Charles Sheeler, Man Ray, Lyonel Feininger, Grant Wood and Alfred Stieglitz. Through paintings, works on paper, sculptures and photographs the exhibition presents a splendid impression of the development of modern art in America and sheds new light on the oeuvre of Hopper.





Edward Hopper


Edward Hopper
South Carolina Morning, 1955
Oil on canvas – 77,6 x 102,2 cm
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
given in memory of Otto L. Spaeth by his Family
Photograph by Sheldan C. Collins
© All rights reserved





In the Netherlands the works by Hopper’s contemporaries are relatively unknown. The exhibition Modern Life compares Edward Hopper’s work to the various movements in art that he encountered during his career: to the Ashcan School painters who surrounded Hopper’s teacher Robert Henri and drew their inspiration from day-to-day urban life; to the avant-garde movements around the Whitney Studio Club and Alfred Stieglitz’ 291 Gallery that were influenced by European movements; to the social engagement by the American Scene painters that captured the traditions of the rural areas; and to the futurist works by the Machine Age painters, who were inspired by both the industrial landscape and urban architecture.


    Edward Hopper

The exhibition shows that Hopper’s work cannot be seen separately from the divergent and sometimes contradictory movements in American art, but needs to be considered and placed right amongst them. Hopper shared the fascination for cities with the painters belonging to the Ashcan School, for example, but was less interested in urban amusement, for instance in boxing matches, than George Bellows and less fascinated by the New York society than Guy Pène du Bois. He painted the American landscape as the American Scene painters did, but in a way that can be considered much more abstract than the realist scenes by Thomas Hart Benton and John Steuart Curry. A child of his time, Hopper imperceptibly integrated the prevailing forces at work in American art into his visual universe. But at the same time he lent them a timeless character that makes them still relevant today. Therefore up to now, Hopper has remained one of the utmost favourites of American art history.


Edward Hopper


Edward Hopper
Seven A.M. 1948
Oil on canvas – 76,7 x 101,9 cm
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
Photograph by Steven Sloman
© All rights reserved

Robert Henri


Robert Henri
Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, 1916
Oil on canvas – 127 x 182,9 cm
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
Gift of Flora Whitney Miller
Photograph by Jerry L. Thompson
© All rights reserved

Raphael Soyer



Raphael Soyer
Office Girls, 1936
Oil on canvas – 66 x 61 cm
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
Photograph by Jerry L. Thompson
© All rights reserved





The exhibition at Kunsthal Rotterdam takes place as part of the celebration of 400 years New York (1609 — 2009). The exhibition has been compiled by the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York and is currently on display in the Bucerius Kunst Forum in Hamburg. After Rotterdam the exhibition most likely travels on to the Ufizzi Gallery in Florence, Italy (February — May 2010).




Courtesy Kunsthal Rotterdam
Images © Their respective owners. All rights reserved





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Stampfli & Turci – Art Dealers


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~ by Stampfli & Turci on September 29, 2009.

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