Pipilotti Rist creates a monumental site-specific installation at MoMA






MoMA, The Museum of Modern Art, New York

The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium, second floor



Pipilotti Rist: Pour Your Body Out (7354 Cubic Meters)
Exhibition > February 2, 2009



MoMA’s Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium Immersed in Moving Images for the First Time.

The Museum of Modern Art presents a new large-scale
installation by Swiss artist Pipilotti Rist (b. 1962), entitled Pour Your Body Out (7354 Cubic Meters).






Pipilotti Rist

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Installation view of Pipilotti Rist’s Pour Your Body Out (7354 Cubic Meters) at The Museum of Modern Art, 2008.
Multichannel video projection (color, sound), projector enclosures, circular seating element, carpet.
Courtesy the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and Hauser & Wirth Zürich London.
© 2008 Pipilotti Rist.
Photo: © Frederick Charles, fcharles.com






A pioneer in the field of innovative multimedia installations, Rist is best known for her playfully provocative video, sound, and sculptural environments. MoMA commissioned the artist to reinvent the space and reenvision the architecture of the Museum’s Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium — a space with a volume measuring approximately 7,354 cubic meters. The resulting installation is a lush, immersive landscape shaped by images, sound, and sculptural elements. The installation is organized by Klaus Biesenbach, Chief Curator, The Department of Media, The Museum of Modern Art, and will be on view November 19, 2008, to February 2, 2009.

Pour Your Body Out expresses the artist’s wish to reconcile viewers with the perception of their own bodies and the surrounding environment through the acceptance of the unbelievable variety of beautiful and ugly forms that make up human beings and the world. In this work, Rist’s intent is to visualize an individual’s interior thought process on the walls of the atrium. At the same time, the title alludes to the impressive volume of the central atrium as an architectural structure.

This larger-than-human-scale, site-specific installation envelops the walls of MoMA’s atrium for the first time in a vivid panorama of moving images, measuring 25 feet high and 200 feet across in almost every direction. A continuous flow of multiple high-definition projections fills the Museum building’s center with light and color, transforming it into a gigantic pool of moving images. The video content is shown in extreme slow motion with imagery including gigantic tulips; a human and a pig both biting into juicy apples in a lush meadow; and the same human moving wildly and weightlessly, and floating in a sea of abstracted, fire-colored branches that resemble the bronchial system. Music created by Anders Guggisberg emanates from a sculptural seating element inspired by the shape of the human eye. Projectors are mounted 25 feet above the floor, housed in bubble-shaped enclosures conceived by the artist and Atelier Rist Sisters. Colorful curtains cascade in tiers from the sixth floor down to darken the atrium, and the floor is covered in carpet of various textures and colors. The artist invites visitors to experience the installation by taking off their shoes, lying on the round sofa or on the carpeted floor, or singing or dancing around freely. Mr. Biesenbach says, “In Pipilotti Rist’s installations, the viewer is at all times immersed and part of an ‘oceanic’ volume of light, colors, and sounds.”





Pipilotti Rist

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Installation view of Pipilotti Rist’s Pour Your Body Out (7354 Cubic Meters) at The Museum of Modern Art, 2008.
Multichannel video projection (color, sound), projector enclosures, circular seating element, carpet.
Courtesy the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and Hauser & Wirth Zürich London.
© 2008 Pipilotti Rist.
Photo: © Frederick Charles, fcharles.com

Pipilotti Rist

fchas_208-11-16_4214_copyrighted


Installation view of Pipilotti Rist’s Pour Your Body Out (7354 Cubic Meters) at The Museum of Modern Art, 2008.
Multichannel video projection (color, sound), projector enclosures, circular seating element, carpet.
Courtesy the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and Hauser & Wirth Zürich London.
© 2008 Pipilotti Rist.
Photo: © Frederick Charles, fcharles.com






Pour Your Body Out (7354 Cubic Meters) emerges from Rist’s tradition of creating multisensory, multimedia installations. In 2005 Rist was the Swiss representative to the 51st Venice Biennale, where she presented Homo sapiens sapiens (2005), an expansive video projected onto the entire ceiling of the historical San Stae church with moving imagery inspired by traditional Venetian painters and religious iconography of the Italian church. While gazing at Rist’s interpretation of the Garden of Eden, visitors were invited to remove their shoes and recline on soft furnishings designed by the artist.

This new commission will be acquired by the Museum, which already owns several of Rist’s early single-channel works as well as the installation Ever is Over All (1997). Many of her earliest videos were made around the experimental klezmer-punk-pop band Les Reines Prochaines, of which she was a member from 1988 to 1994. In the early 1990s, Rist began experimenting with various forms of electronic media, resulting in installations that mine the strong, subconscious associations with the body.


Behind the Scenes with Pipilotti Rist:


© 2008 The Museum of Modern Art, New York

Curator Klaus Biesenbach discusses the exhibition:


© 2008 The Museum of Modern Art, New York


    © 2008 The Museum of Modern Art, New York







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Stampfli & Turci Art Dealers – Espaces Arts & Objets





~ by Stampfli & Turci on December 26, 2008.

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